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Normal Range of Humeral Head Positioning on the Glenoid on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Validation through Comparison of Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow 2018;21:186-191
Published online December 1, 2018
© 2018 Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society.

Jung-Han Kim, Young-Kyoung Min

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea
Correspondence to: Young-Kyoung Min
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 75 Bokji-ro, Busanjin-gu, Busan 47392, Korea
Tel: +82-51-890-6129, Fax: +82-51-892-6619, E-mail: dazuri@hanmail.net, ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8076-7265
IRB approval: Inje University Busan Paik Hospital (No. 17-0127).
Received June 12, 2018; Revised September 12, 2018; Accepted November 12, 2018.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Background: To determine the normal range of humeral head positioning on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Methods: We selected normal subjects (64 patients; group A) to study the normal range of humeral head positioning on the glenoid by MRI measurements. To compare the MRI measurement method with the computed tomography (CT), we selected group B (70 patients) who underwent both MRI and CT. We measured the humeral-scapular alignment (HSA) and the humeral-glenoid alignment (HGA). 
Results: The HSA in the control group was 1.47 짹 1.05 mm, and the HGA with and without reconstruction were 1.15 짹 0.65 mm and 1.03 짹 0.59 mm, respectively, on MRI. In the test group, HSA was 2.67 짹 1.47 mm and HGA with and without reconstruction was 1.58 짹 1.16 mm and 1.49 짹 1.08 mm, on MRI. On CT, the HSA was 1.72 짹 1.01 mm, and HGA with and without reconstruction were 1.54 짹 0.96 mm and 1.59 짹 0.93 mm, respectively. HSA was significantly different according to image modality (p=0.0006), but HGA was not significantly different regardless of reconstruction (p=0.8836 and 0.9234).
Conclusions: Although additional CT scans can be taken to measure decentering in patients with rotator cuff tears, reliable measurements can be obtained with MRI alone. When using MRI, it is better to use HGA, which is a more reliable measurement value based on the comparison with CT measurement (study design: Study of Diagnostic Test; Level of evidence II).
Keywords : Humeral head position; Rotator cuff tears; Decentering; Humeral-scapular alignment; Humeral-glenoid alignment