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Relationship of Posterior Decentering of the Humeral Head with Tear Size and Fatty Degeneration in Rotator Cuff Tear
Clin Should Elbow 2019;22:121-127
Published online September 1, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.5397/cise.2019.22.3.121
© 2019 Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society.

Jung-Han Kim, Hyeong-Won Seo

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea
Correspondence to: Hyeong-Won Seo
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, 75 Bokji-ro, Busanjin-gu, Busan 47392, Korea
Tel: +82-51-890-6129, Fax: +82-51-892-6619, E-mail: pointingx77@gmail.com, ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4256-1928
IRB approval: Inje University Busan Paik Hospital (No.17-0127).
Received March 9, 2019; Revised June 3, 2019; Accepted July 14, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Background: Posterior decentering is not an uncommon finding on rotator cuff tear patients shoulder magnetic resonance imaging. No previous study has reported on the relationship between posterior decentering and rotator cuff tear.
Methods: We assessed patients rotator cuff tear humeral head positions based on humeral–scapular alignment (HSA). Subjects were classified into centering and decentering groups based on a <2 mm or >2 mm HSA value, respectively. Differences in rotator cuff tear size, degree of tear, and fatty degeneration between the two groups were evaluated.
Results: One hundred seventy-five patients (80 males, 95 females; mean age: 59.7 짹 6.5 years old) were selected as subjects (casecontrol study; level of evidence: 3). Tear size, degree of subscapularis tendon tear, and fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001).
Conclusions: The occurrence of decentering was related to rotator cuff tear size, degree of subscapularis tendon tear, and fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles.
Keywords : Rotator cuff injuries; Shoulder joint; Decentering; Humeral–scapular alignment