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Current Trends for Treating Lateral Epicondylitis
Clin Should Elbow 2019;22:227-234
Published online December 1, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.5397/cise.2019.22.4.227
© 2019 Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society.

Gyeong Min Kim, Seung Jin Yoo, Sungwook Choi, Yong-Geun Park

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju, Korea
Correspondence to: Yong-Geun Park
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, 15 Aran 13-gil, Jeju 63241, Korea
Tel: +82-64-717-2710, Fax: +82-64-717-1697, E-mail: cellulosae@naver.com, pyk184@hanmail.net, ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9156-1203
Review article does not need an IRB approval.
Received August 29, 2019; Revised October 22, 2019; Accepted October 23, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 Abstract
Lateral epicondylitis, also known as 쁳ennis elbow, is a degenerative rather than inflammatory tendinopathy, causing chronic recalcitrant pain in elbow joints. Although most patients with lateral epicondylitis resolve spontaneously or with standard conservative management, few refractory lateral epicondylitis are candidates for alternative non-operative and operative modalities. Other than standard conservative treatments including rest, analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, orthosis and physical therapies, nonoperative treatments encompass interventional therapies include different types of injections, such as corticosteroid, lidocaine, autologous blood, platelet-rich plasma, and botulinum toxin, which are available for both short-term and long-term outcomes in pain resolution and functional improvement. In addition, newly emerging biologic enhancement products such as bone marrow aspirate concentrate and autologous tenocyte injectates are also under clinical use and investigations. Despite all non-operative therapeutic trials, persistent debilitating pain in patients with lateral epicondylitis for more than 6 months are candidates for surgical treatment, which include open, percutaneous, and arthroscopic approaches. This review addresses the current updates on emerging non-operative injection therapies as well as arthroscopic intervention in lateral epicondylitis.
Keywords : Platelet-rich plasma; Injections; Arthroscopy; Tennis elbow